“Internationalization at Home” in the United States

Enhancing admissions and enrollment practices for marginalized students during and after the COVID-19 pandemic

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Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionately negative impact on Black, Brown, Indigenous and low-income communities, further marginalizing already marginalized students and their families. The marginalization has placed these students at a greater disadvantage when applying to college, unless admissions and enrollment practitioners account for these disadvantages in their practices. In this chapter, we discuss college admissions and enrollment issues that directly impact marginalized students, including students of color and students from low-income households, and how the concept of “Internationalization at Home” could be used to build inclusive practices in admissions and enrollment during and after the pandemic. In doing so, we provide examples to illustrate how admissions and enrollment officers can incorporate the concept into their practice.

How to cite this chapter:

Muñiz, R., & Borg, N. (2022). “Internationalization at home” in the United States: Enhancing admissions and enrollment practices for marginalized students during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. In  R. Ammigan, R. Y. Chan, & K. Bista, (eds), COVID-19 and higher education in the global context: Exploring contemporary issues and challenges (pp. 38-50). STAR Scholars. https://starscholars.org/product/covid-19-and-higed/

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Author Biographies

Raquel Muñiz, Boston College

Raquel Muñiz, J.D., Ph.D. is an attorney and an Assistant Professor of law and education policy at the Lynch School of Education and Human Development at Boston College, as well as a liaison with the College of Law. As a socio-legal scholar, her research agenda includes two lines of inquiry: 1) examining the role of the law and accompanying policies in furthering educational equity for all students, particularly students who have experienced substantial adversity throughout their lives; and 2) examining the use of research evidence in the legal system and public policy decision-making where such decision-making has implications for educational equity. Email: munizcas@bc.edu

 

Natalie Borg, Boston College

Natalie Borg, M.Ed. is a doctoral candidate of Higher Education at the Lynch School of Education and Human Development at Boston College. Her research interests focus on enhancing inclusion for marginalized students in higher education, exploring how internal and external policies impact inclusion for marginalized students, and enhancing support for Latinx and DACAmented students and their support networks at higher education institutions in the United States.

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Published

2021-09-26